multiple samplers = cross training. different processes en route the same end goal helps you learn yer sh*t.

Sampling makes you a better listener, and better listeners make better music.

Great sounds in isolation don’t always work in the mix or in a track. Picking things apart deconstructs and demystifies the puzzle.

Would you be more efficient and faster if you create or pick sounds with the mix in mind?

Sampling helps with this. It’s not just your ears either. Typically you can see the waveform when using or editing samples, so you learn what a great sound looks like. Really helpful.

What’s a transient? Look at a bunch, and you’ll figure it out. Move and place them on the grid. You’ll hear and associate what’s what almost immediately.

Do you need to make all your sounds? No.

Do you need to make any? Probably.

Don’t be a purist. You don’t have to do everything. Dave Van Ronk says purists become dentists! **Read his book–amazing!**

You’re probably your own band. Great purchased samples are cooperative collaborators. Make it easy. Easy isn’t lazy. It’s efficient. (Try F9 Audio. Great sample pack here.)

What if this all sped up the writing process? Would your tracks be better quicker because these sounds work in finished tracks?

Better tracks = better music. Learn sampling.

-ed